Bowsprite: A New York Harbor Sketchbook

Fleet Week 2014 / National Stationery Show last day

Posted in Uncategorized by bowsprite on 2014/05/21

Fleet Week begins today, with a parade of ships!
The following ships will represent the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard during Fleet Week 2014:

USS McFaul (DDG 74),

USS Cole (DDG 67),

USS Oak Hill (LSD 51),

Coast Guard cutter Katherine Walker (WLM 552)

Coast Guard cutter Campbell (WMEC909).

Cole will lead as the ships enter the Ambrose Channel at approximately 8:15 a.m., with
ships in formation behind, passing Buoys 19 and 20 at approximately 9 a.m. The New York
City Fire Department (FDNY) will join at 9:15 a.m. At 9:30 a.m., Cole will be on the beam of
historic Fort Hamilton, with each ship following at 3.75 min intervals. Oak Hill will render
honors as it passes the One World Trade Center at approximately 10:15 a.m.

The ships can be seen from virtually any view of the river, from the Battery
Conservancy to just south of the George Washington Bridge, and on the other side of the river
in Jersey City, Hoboken and Weehawken, up to Fort Lee, New Jersey.
You will be able to see them here:

Pier 92 Manhattan:
- USS Oak Hill (LSD 51)
- USCG cutter Campbell (WMEC 909)
Sullivans Pier Staten Island:
- USS McFaul (DDG 74)
- USS Cole (DDG 67)
- USCG cutter Katherine Walker (WLM 552).
Public visitation on Navy ships and USCG cutters begins Thursday, May 22 and continues through Monday, May 26. Public visitation is 8:00am to 5:00pm daily. Visitors are reminded that lines may be capped early so that the last people in line have an opportunity to complete their tours. For more information, visit the official Fleet Week New York City Web site.

contraband

Bowsprite’s tips for the stars: always carry a knife. Except when visiting at pier 92. Bring a water bottle you will not be heartbroken to leave behind.

“Fleet Week New York, now in its 26th year…Nearly 1,500 Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen are participating  this year.”
Me, too, after I pack up the show today! this is booth 1366, with visiting urchins:

boothwUrchins

military men

Posted in Uncategorized by bowsprite on 2012/12/18

I did not know any military people until I began to work on boats. I still do not know any military women very well, just by correspondence. But I’ve met some men. Different world.

With a few rich and generous exceptions, they don’t blog. They don’t like to reveal much. It is not easy to drag a good story out of them.

But every now and then, in a calm crossing of the river while we’re both in the wheelhouse, I’d hear:
“Did I ever tell you? Oh, you’ll like this one—we were in the PBR, they were shooting at us, and let me tell you how this boat was made: you could turn a valve to use the motor to pump the water that was filling up in the boat OUT. It was called a crash turn. But you couldn’t move, then. We had to choose: pump out the boat, or get our asses outta there.”
“The boat was filling up? you were all getting wet?”
Eyes widened: “We were getting SHOT at! YES, our socks were getting wet!”
“Oh, Kenny! where were you? when was this?”
“I can’t tell you.”
“Well, who made the boat?”
“I can’t tell you.”
“Come on! Oh, pretty please?”
“No. I can’t.”

kenny

Tried to find the boat. A good resource here: the Historic Naval Ships Association.

They see things differently. My dear girlfriend Lilian is a potter, she gave me beautiful red clay to pinch into pots for my succulents. One ex-CG friend picked up the bag of the heavy dense stuff and asked, “It this your bag of plastic explosive?”

succulents

I could not tell if he was serious or not. That’s another thing. Poker faced, even when you step on their toes really hard by accident with a high-heeled shoe.

They act differently. Chloe, who lives in the east village, told me of a time when a fellow who was a NAVY SEAL visited her. He walked up to her fifth floor apartment of a tenement building, and warned her: “Watch out, these guys are packed around here.” He was able to detect some of her neighbors coming down the stairs concealing weapons under their pants legs. While he was there, he heard a noise and with his broad arm, pushed Chloe down to the floor and crouched protectively over her:
“What’s that?”
Chloe, stuttering, “It-it’s the fax machine. I’m getting a fax.” She works from home.

navyseal

Well, for some of us, there will always be that fascination:

And! though not Military, fellow ship portraitist Pamela just sent me this: SECRET FBI sale! Dec. 20, for the first time in its history, the Federal Bureau of Investigation will open its New York store:

“The rare offer for G-men branded gear is good for four hours only. Intelligence locates the store somewhere between the 22nd and 29th floor of 26 Federal Plaza. Special clearance required.”

growler

Posted in Uncategorized by bowsprite on 2012/05/13

Growler is the sole survivor of the Navy’s fleet of pioneering strategic missile diesel powered submarines.”
Historic Naval Ships Association

U.S.S. GROWLER SSG-577

Class: Grayback/Regulus II Submarine
Launched: April 5, 1958
At: Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Commissioned: August 30, 1958

Length: 317′ 7″ / 96.8 m
Beam: 27′ 2″ / 8.3 m
Draft: 19′ (surface trim) / 5.8 m
Displacement: 2,768 tons (surfaced)
Armament: Regulus I and II missiles

Speed: maximum surfaced – 20 knots
maximum submerged – 12 knots

Complement:   9 officers, 11 chief petty officers, 68 crewmen

Decommissioned: May 25, 1964

Growler was destined to be sunk as a target, but was saved at the last minute by the Intrepid Museum. More details here. Cool old photos on NavSource.

Pier 86 is the location of the Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum (West 46th Street & 12th Avenue).

We were surveying some piers located north of the museum, and would have to take tide readings regularly off a tide board posted up just east of this submarine, so these workers would watch us go back and forth, and wave:

And they know what many of us know: any day on the water is better than a good day at the office.

However, if you are in the office, check out Maritime Monday’s submarine edition and order a sub for lunch.

cup of joe

Posted in drunken sailor, navy by bowsprite on 2010/09/23

Army’s version: this comes from “a cup of (Jolt Of Energy) joe.” Or, it is a drink as common as the “GI Joe.”
Does G.I. stand for Ground Infantry? General Issue? Galvanized Iron? Government Issued!

Navy’s version: this comes from the secretary of the US Navy, Admiral Josephus ‘Joe’ Daniels who banned the serving of alcohol on ships in 1914, serving nothing stronger than coffee (although the phrase is known to predate his service.)
thanks, Joe! this’s joe’s for you
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