Bowsprite: A New York Harbor Sketchbook

hawser, line and wire: happy 50th!

Posted in Uncategorized by bowsprite on 2013/02/20

Some tugs are named after rivers. Some after seas, some after trees. Some are named after American Indian tribes.

harbortug

But the CG has a class of tugs that wins the award for best names: the 65-foot Small Harbor Tug (WYTL).
Named after things normal people call “rope”, and things found on a boat that interact with the “rope,” or, in one case, what normal people call “droop” of a rope, to those who love tugs, these names are little, one-word love poems, odes to the small harbor working tug.

The WYTLs were built between 1962 and 1967, and were employed only on the east coast, from Maine to Virginia. Originally a class of 15 tugs built by different shipyards, 11 are still in service:

  • BOLLARD (WYTL 65614)  New Haven, CT
  • BRIDLE (WYTL 65607)  Southwest Harbor, ME
  • CAPSTAN (WYTL 65601)  Philadelphia, PA
  • CHOCK (WYTL 65602)  Portsmouth VA
  • CLEAT (WYTL 65615)  Philadelphia, PA
  • HAWSER (WYTL 65610)  Bayonne, NJ
  • LINE (WYTL 65611)  Bayonne, NJ
  • PENDANT (WYTL 65608)  Boston, MA
  • SHACKLE (WYTL 65609)  South Portland, ME
  • TACKLE (WYTL 65604)  Rockland, ME
  • WIRE (WYTL 65612)  Saugerties, NY

BITT  (WYTL 65613)  was decommissioned on 4 October 1982, now  R/V Clifford A. Barnes
SWIVEL  (WYTL 65603) , still SWIVEL at Governor’s Island
TOWLINE  (WYTL 65605) perhaps for sale, and
CATENARY  (WYTL 65606), now Growler

 

And YOU are invited to the 50th birthday celebration of  Hawser (17 Jan 1963), Line (21 Feb 1963), and Wire (19 Mar 1963):

“1 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013: the three tugs will meet at the Walkway over the Hudson and steam north to Saugerties. A Coast Guard spokesperson will be available at the walkway and there will be a photo opportunity there to capture the tugs together on the Hudson River.” USCG Media Advisor

icebreakingtugs
According to Hudsonian’s  & Tugster’s photos, all three have expanded the cabins aft to enclose the stack. So the drawing above is incorrect. Do not use for navigation.
Like one to take home? look here.

Length: 65 ft
Beam: 16 ft
Displacement: 72 tons
Power Plant: Upgrading to
500 HP

The Naval Institute Guide To The Ships And Aircraft Of the U.S. Fleet, Norman Polmar

back by popular demand/command

Posted in coast guard cutters by bowsprite on 2010/04/02

Back by popular demand, the barrel is hereby returned to its rightful place on the OTO-Melara 76mm cannon of the CGC Escanaba.

Due to well-meaning–but unfounded–national security concerns, the gun barrel had been omitted. The illustrator apologizes for any crudities (crudites?) that may have occurred as a result of this misguided emasculation.

“the deck gun…retracted…?” — from a reader

“Didn’t you forget the gun barrel here ?
As a male, it seems important to me.”
— from another reader

Sorry, Commander Ed.

Click here to see the goings-on onboard the Escanaba.

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